• If you haven’t already done so, consider what a no-deal scenario or WTO rules would mean for your organisation.
  • Determine what customs procedures you presently comply with outside the EU as part of the EU28.
  • Be prepared, if the need arises, to apply these customs procedures to imports from or exports to the EU27.
  • Ensure you are fully aware of the harmonised system (HS) codes for your products.
  • Familiarise yourself, too, with the EU most-favoured-nation (MFN) tariffs applicable to your products.
  • Be aware of the rules of origin. This means knowing where you are sourcing materials as well as where companies in your supply chain are sourcing material and being able to provide proof. This information will be used to determine tariffs in the case of a WTO or free trade agreement scenario.
  • Consider how resilient your supply chain is to potential border delays. Assess road and seaport infrastructure and cost and time comparisons between transit routes.
  • You may also need to check product lead times and storage and stock levels and any safety and security declarations. Are you required to have your products tested or certified against EU standards in order for them to enter the EU market?
  • Apply for Authorised Economic Operator (AEO) status if you haven’t already done so. AEO status can provide the right to fast-track shipments through the customs process. The application process is complex with around 270 questions on legal, HR, IT and financial issues.  Your Moore Kingston Smith partner can advise you further on this.
  • If you are selling goods to the EU27 you will need an Economic Operator Regulation & Identification (EROI) number. You can apply online at www.hmrc.gov.uk/shortforms/form/EROIVAT
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